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Peacock Proverbs

In the human world there are many showy persons, many ostentatious human peacocks. The following consists of proverbs, adapted proverbs, and proverbial sayings that could fit in well enough too. The aim is to help teenagers and their betters to steer outside of smug decadence.

LoSome peacocks fight one another

Chickens today, feathers tomorrow. (1)

Followers of a feather flock together.

A peacock has fair feathers, but foul feet.

A harem of peacock hens belong to the most persevering.

Much depends on the vigilant eye.

Some peacocks fight one another.

No peacock should go all alone throughout life.

Birds are birds, and birds fight a lot.

Feather by feather a peacock may be plucked.

The reason why no gullible ones regularly worship owls, could be that those birds were not imported.

High hopes in a chicken seem too vain at times.

Some guys suffer terribly from lack of handling know-how on peacocks.

There is more to a bird than fine feathers.

Realism looms taller than peacock tales.◊

The better the cook, the tastier the peacock stew.

Fine feathers have only surface brilliance.

LoCackling becomes a burden as heavy as lead to some

Cackling hens and followers rely terribly on cackling and goading. (3)

A pound of peacock feathers and a pound of lead weigh the same.

You can't eat your peacock and have it too.

LoFine feathers and fine clothing make fine fowls, but how human are they?

A bird is not horribly far from being a flying reptile. A peacock who knows how close he is, had better use his feathers as best he can. (5)

Cackling hens may easily get under a crowing peacock's misty sway. By this you could measure some folks.

Fake not, and shun a "fine feather parade".

A peacock is a spectacular bird, and flirtatious only to its own kind.

Fine feathers make fine fowl.

Plumed goading suits a bird, but not really a man.

Send a poor peacock to the zoo to be looked at, and a poor peacock he returns.

Modern man learns little where peacocks take him.

Feathers are conformity-ensuring things, and so are fashions.

A fowl may be eaten with a healthy appetite. MM

Stop listening to hearsay-linked cackling.

A peacock can be plucked, but not from afar.

After you have plucked all the feathers of a peacock, there is to be hope. * (7)

Feathers float while pearls lie low.

We cannot put new feathers on a bird without advanced equipment.

Gist

IN SUM
  1. Don't be carried away by the show of a peacock.
  2. Cackling is soon found to be a burden.
  3. Fine feathers of clothing make fine fowls, but how human are they? That is the question.
IN NUCE Don't be carried away by cackling peacocks in fine feathers. A fully functioning human being is more. (A Rogerian term)

Comments

Inspired peacock serenades may hinder and block full use of the technology of yoga - or yoga teachings, in short. Success in good yoga is principally by diving inside (interiorisation of the awareness); croaking and crooning is of the outside, and needs to be overcome some way or other.

The tale-teller on his porch, commenting on a few of the sayings,

"Do not take all hope away from show-people and the hordes that would love to be like them. Don't take the straw or twig away from a drowning man either. As a matter of fact, a weight of peacock feathers (desires for glamour) and a pound of lead are hard to carry.
      To have high hopes in a chicken (vanity-circus fixated teenager) seems too vain at times.

A good goat seldom needs gold to defend himself.

Good conformity seldom makes you a victim or slave of molesting, marring ones.

A peacock tail seems to fight against nature.

Sound libido outlets, call it another tunnel of death, as you like.
      He or she who plunges into jarred peacock living resembles a man who rolls from the tip of a precipice.

Even though a peacock may exhort us to forego normal, regular adaptations fit for marriage, no peacock is complete by itself.

Realism looms taller than being taken in by farce sayings.

Those who swagger and strut and parade in fine feathers, shun them. It may be far from easy.

TO TOP

Actors, Liars and Bluffers

"I've been to Hollywood," sings Neil Young in his Heart of Gold. There are others that have gone there too. One sunny day in Hollywood a young and becoming American - let us call him Olbert - spoke of the Self-Realization Fellowship Lessons. He had put high and fervent hopes in them. He had already travelled a long way to be near the fellowship's "sluice-gate" and temple at Sunset Boulevard, and after some time he entered the fellowship's monastic order as a novice. He became a well-known movie actor later.

But years before the soap opera status, on a memorable day under the all too pink sky, Olbert suddenly said, with intensity, "Master [Yogananda] said all you need to know are in the lessons."

It is not. It does not teach you how to dress and undress, for example. But Yogananda does teach the world is a stage, we are actors, and had better play our parts well, and so on. Actors might like that to it. Another side is feigning. Compare a Swedish actor and former pop artist,, "You just line up and lie." There is more to acting than that. "Pretend" or "make believe" has a somewhat nicer ring to it than "lie".

Many liars and bluffers can be found out

Modern research has shown that persons who lie or bluff betray themselves by their body language and so on. And good actors are not supposed to do that. Liars

  • blink "all the time"
  • are poor at focusing their gaze
  • do not keep their face still.
  • Tend to have unnatural smiles without "smile wrinkles" around the eyes.
The bluffer
  • cannot keep his legs still
  • keeps his hands lying still, and readily lock them in a firm grip.

These are some markers to be thought about with some reservation, cum grano sale, since inveterate liars and psychopaths may dispense with any such things. It is also true that yogis learn to keep their eyes fixed and body quite unmoving - it is found to counteract the effects of lying and bluffing. Yogis

  • learn to focus the gaze intently for minutes and up to several hours on end each day;
  • sit in fixed postures that counteract movements of legs and so on. Advanced postures even lock the legs.
  • lock the hands in specified hand postures called mudras.

There is more to it too, such as closing the eyes and relaxing. It could all counteracts the marring, self-revealing fixtures of lying and bluffing.

What does all this add up to? Is there a particular need in bad gurus to combat lying amd stay honest? You decide. Inveterate cheating is not all easy to deal with in any case.

Modern yogis need to stay clean and keep integrated, and postures and hand placements and so on serve it.

Acting in films and on TV is a living where one may get help in painting one's face to look good and making a finer impression than natural - as part of a way of living that only rarely involves killing innocents for real, despite appearances. That can be very good, like not having to slaughter your reindeer yourself, for example.

How to handle your peacock

img
Goading peacock

Some guys suffer terribly from lack of handling knowhow on peacocks: actors and the like. Decide whether your "peacock" is spoiled. After all, tense goading or overdramatisation may not be good signs.

Some would claim that an innocent ploughman is of more worth than a peacock that plunders. What do you think?

In Hollywood too, a harem of peacock hens belong to the persevering, it seems.

As for "The better the cook, the tastier the peacock stew," you may add, "The better the film director, the better the peacock stew (movie). See what happens!"

Cackling hens may easily get under a crowing peacock's misty sway, and Hollywood actors are influential people. A peacock is much of a bird, much of a token too. Actors are a popular lot.

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