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Men of Zen

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TAO STUDY

The Zen Eczentric Puhua

Handling brambles

DEAL

Through getting simple, intensity of mind is had. Lying contemplation can be brightness-furthering too. A result of it is roaming the streets and calling out -

Lo Gain freedom to lie down to get brighter: the lying "sitting" is what is thought of

bird Little is known about Fuke (Puhua, died c. 860), the Chinese monk told of in "The Records of the Zen Master Linchi", where Fuke is admired as a free spirit:

When asked intellectual questions about Buddhism, Fuke kicked over the dinner table; when called a donkey, he brayed loudly; when scolded for his coarse behavior, he replied, "What does the Buddhist dharma have to do with coarse or fine?"

Fuke was most famous for roaming the streets ringing a small bell and calling out. One day Fuke walked around asking for a one-piece robe. He refused all offers until Lin-chi, who alone understood his request, had a coffin made for him. Fuke told the townsfolk that he was going to take the coffin to the East Gate and depart this life, but when after three days he had not done so, the people stopped paying attention. He then went to the East Gate by himself, lay down in the coffin, and asked a passerby to nail it up; when the townsfolk heard the news and came to open the coffin, it was empty. Only the sound of his bell remained, ever more faintly chiming: ding . . . ding . . . ding.

LoDrawing principles

Zen principles of drawings include:

1. Unity of subject and object,
2. Concentration of spirit;
3. Avoidance of overt emotional displays.

LoExpressivity

Evocative ink painting express things in ways that facts may not manage. [Taoz 35]

Points

IN SUM
  1. GAIN AT LEAST FREEDOM OF THOUGHT. INTERNET COULD HELP.
  2. TO GET ON AND UP CAN BE AIDED BY BEST ZEN PRINCIPLES. ENSURE YOU PRACTICE IN FAIR FREEDOM, FREE FROM TYRANNY, FROM THE ONSET. Basic Zen principles:
    • Forge subject and object,
    • Concentrate the mind well;
    • Live up to the best you get: avoid just emotional display for handy, all-over attainments instead.

  3. DELIGHTFUL DRAWINGS MAY NOT HURT, and may get much popular in time too.

Simple adages We may gain freedom of thought, freedom from tyrants, and in that freedom attain to delightful drawings. Some tyrants excel in playing on devotion to them.

More on Fuke and his variant of Zen

Fuke Zen was a branch of Zen Buddhism that existed in Japan from the 1200s until the late 1800s. Fuke Zen, according to some accounts, is derived from the teachings of the Chinese Zen teacher Linji Yixuan (c. 800-866), known in Japan as Rinzai Gigen. But the Fuke school counted as its founder one of Linji's contemporaries, Puhua (Fuke in Japanese). Puhua was reputedly a multi-talented monk.

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Other Zen Personages In Short

Yinyuan Longqi (Ingen) (1592-1673)

Yinyuan Longqi (Japanese: Ingen Ryuki was a Chinese Linji Chan Buddhist monk, poet, and calligrapher. At the age of sixteen, Ingen decided to become a monk. Three years later, after wanderings, everything seemed in vain to him, so he entered a temple where he was given a lowly position, serving tea. He was twenty-nine years old when he was ordained a priest.

Ingen asked the Zen master Mi-yun (Japanese: Mitsuun, 1566-1642), "Please show me."

Mi-yun replied: "When you need to go someplace, go; when you want to lie down, lie down."

"What shall I do when I can't sleep at night because of the mosquitoes?" asked Ingen.

"Hit one of them," Mi-yun answered.

Seven days later Mi-yun passed by the meditation hall, and Ingen happened to glance at him. At that moment Ingen said to Mi-yun, "Now I understand what you told me."

"Show me," Mi-yun replied. Ingen gave a Zen shout, but Mi-yun repeated his request. Ingen again replied with a shout. Miyun then asked, "After several shouts, how about you?"

"This year the salt is very expensive, just like rice," Ingen answered.

"You may go now, but be careful and never obstruct people, " Mi-yun finally told him. Ingen turned impressive. Ingen fascinated. A new kind of realism was found under his patronage. [Taoz 75-79]

Putting time and effort into advancing

Advancing with consent
May bring much good fortune.
Putting time and effort into doing something
Can also make things go well.
Persistence is fairly often needed.

ZEN BUDDHISM COLLECTION
Men of Zen, Hakuin and others, END MATTER

Men of Zen, Hakuin and others, LITERATURE  

Ca: Chan, Wing-Tsit. A Source Book in Chinese Philosophy. New Jersey: Princeton University Press, 1963.

Fdv: Dørumsgaard, Arne. Fra duggens verden. Basho i norsk gjendiktning (1644-1694). Oslo: Dreyer, 1985.

Jap: Bownas, Geoffrey, and Anthony Thwaite. Japanese Verse. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1964.

Jc: Chang, Jolan. Kærlighedens og seksuallivets tao. Den gamle kinesiske vej til sanselig lykke. København: Borgen, 1978.

Pap: Warnche, Carsten-Peter. Pablo Picasso 1881-1973. Edited by Ingo Walther. Vols 1-2. Køln: Benedikt Taschen, 1995.

Paz: Fromm, Erich: Psychoanalysis and Zen Buddhism. Unwin. London, 1986.

Taoz: Addiss, Stephen. The Art of Zen. New York: Abrams, 1980.

Tat: Waley, Arthur, tr. The Way and Its Power. A Study of the Tao the Ching and Its Place in Chinese Thought. New York: Evergreen/Grove, 1958.

Tls: Chang, Jolan. The Tao of Love and Sex. London: Penguin, 1991.

Tun: Yampolsky, Philip, tr. The Platform Sutra of the Sixth Patriarch. The Text of the Tun-Huang Manuscript. New York: Columbia University, 1967.

Ve: Capra, Fritjof. Vendepunktet (The Turning Point). Oslo: Dreyer, 1982.

Wic: Yutang, Lin. The Wisdom of China. London: New English Library, 1963.

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