Site Map
ATU Numbers of Grimm Tales - G
Section › 22 Set Search Previous Next

Reservations Contents  

ATU numbers are used to classify types of folktales in the international folktales catalogue. The many types of tales are described there too, along with other information. [More]. (See Uther 2004 below).

Below, all the best known Grimm tales are given type numbers, that is, one or more ATU-numbers, for studying them better. Where the ATU type-title is as in the title of a translated, common Grimm tale, the title is left out after the ATU number. Besides, apart from all the tales in the final Grimm edition, data for two more tales is supplied on this page: "Puss in Boots" from the Grimms' first edition, and the legend "The Children of Hameln" (See Grimm, 1981). - Tormod Kinnes

Lazy Heinz

ATU 1430, Air Castles

[Left out]

The Griffin

ATU 610, Fruit to Cure the Princess; ATU 461, Three Hairs from the Devil; and ATU 570, The Rabbit Herd.

[Left out]

The Story of Schlauraffen Land [The Tale of Cockaigne]

ATU 1930, Schlaraffenland

[The Tale]

The Ditmarsch Tale of Wonders

ATU 1930, Schlaraffenland

[Left out]

Allerleirauh [All-Kinds-Of-Fur]

ATU 510B, A King Tries to Marry His Daughter.

[Left out]

Mary's Child

ATU 710

[Left out]

The Crumbs on the Table

ATU 236*, Imitating Bird Sounds. Compare ATU-type 2075, Imitating Animal Sounds.

[Left out]

The Sea-Hare

ATU 554, The Grateful Animals.

[The Tale]

The Glass Coffin

ATU 410, Sleeping Beauty.

[Left out]

Sharing Joy and Sorrow

Similar to ATU 921D*, Witty Answers

[Left out]

The Bright Sun Brings It to Light

ATU 960, The Sun Brings All to Light.

[Left out]

The Little Folks' Presents (The Gifts of the Little People)

ATU 503, The Hunchbacks and the Elves.

[Left out]

Master Pfriem [Master Cobbler's Awl]

ATU 801. Includes an episode of the ATU-type 1248, Loading a Beam Crosswise on a Wagon.

[Left out]

Lean Lisa

ATU 1430, Air Castles. Includes an episode of the ATU-type 2411, Counting Imagined Wealth.

[Left out]

The Moon

ATU Unclassified

[Left out]

The Duration of Life

ATU 173, Human and Animal Life Spans are Readjusted.

[Left out]

Death's Messengers

ATU 335

[Left out]

The Grave Mound

Similar to ATU 815, The Devil Who Skins a Corpse. Contains an episode of the ATU type 1130, A Boot Full of Money.

[Left out]

Maid Maleen

ATU 870, The Entombed Princess.

[Left out]

The Golden Key

ATU 2260

[Left out]

The Hazel Branch

ATU Unclassified

[Left out]

Our Lady's Little Glass

ATU Unclassified

[Left out]

St. Joseph in the Forest

ATU 480, The Kind and the Unkind Girls.

[Left out]

The Twelve Apostles

Similar to ATU 766, The Magic Sleep.

[Left out]

The Rose

ATU Unclassified

[Left out]

The Three Green Branches

ATU 756A, Green Leaves on a Dry Stick

[Left out]

God's Food

ATU Unclassified

[Left out]

Poverty and Humility Lead to Heaven

ATU Unclassified

[Left out]

The Heavenly Wedding

ATU 767

[Left out]

The Aged Mother

ATU Unclassified

[Left out]

The Willow-Wren

ATU 221, The Election of King of Birds, and ATU 221A Test: Who Can Fly Highest?

[The Tale]

Puss in Boots

ATU 545B. Very similar to Type 545A, especially in its single motifs. Variants of Types 545A and 545B are often mixed with each other or they are not clearly differentiated. In all of Western folklore, "Puss in Boots" is the most renowned tale of the type "The animal as helper". The Grimm version of the tale appears in their first edition. Earlier, the French Charles Perrault published a French version, and still earlier, in 1553, Giovanni Francesco Straparola published the first written version, in Venice. (Wikipedia, "Puss in Boots")

[The Tale]

The Children of Hameln (Legend)

ATU 570*, The Rat-Catcher. (The Pied Piper.) The tale is set in 1284 in the town of Hameln, Lower Saxony, Germany. The town had been overrun by rats and mice. A man dressed in odd, colourful cloth struck a bargain with the town dwellers; he agreed to drive the rodents out for a fee. He lured the animals out by playing a flute and drowned them in a river. But alas, the people of the town refused to keep their promise and pay him for it, and the piper went away empty-handed and furious. He came back later the same year when the townspeople were in church, and made all the children more than four years old follow him out of the city and led them to the top of a hill. They were never seen again.

The earliest known record of the story is a depiction in a stained glass window created for the church of Hameln, which dates to around 1300 AD. Several written accounts have survived. The oldest comes from the Lüneburg manuscript (c 1440 – 50). It stated: "In the year of 1284, . . . on June 26, by a piper, clothed in many kinds of colours, 130 children born in Hameln were led away [verledet], and lost at the place of execution near the koppen [one of several domed hills surrounding Hameln]."

There were no rats in the earlier accounts; they were added to the story around the middle of the 16th century. The surviving accounts of the stained glass window depiction do not tell of any rats either. So there might not have been unusually many rats in the town in the first place.

There have been many theories trying to explain what could possibly have happened to the children of Hameln. Some wonder whether they were led elsewhere to work away their lives there, for the colonisation of East Europe started from Low Germany. The "Children of Hameln" might have been led to settle in Moravia, Prussia, Pomerania or elsewhere, it is speculated. But historical proof of anything of this or other forms of speculation is absent.

Suffice to say that many think the intriguing story is based on real events somehow, and that the tale developed over many years into a legend to scare children.

[The Tale]

Contents


Brothers Grimm household tales classified, ATU numbers for Grimm tales, Literature  

Brothers Grimm. The Complete Fairy Tales. Tr. Jack Zipes. Extended 3rd ed. London: Vintage Classics, 2007. ⍽▢⍽ The book contains a translation of the tales in the seventh edition of the Grimm tales from 1857, plus thirty-two more tales that the Grimms shaped and refined and published in earlier editions of the work. Dr Zipes' critically acclaimed, large book (over 1000 pages) contains much of relevant information. Besides, the language of the tales reads well. Better be warned: there are violence-ridden tales among many others.

Grimm, Jacob Ludwig Karl. The German Legends of the Brothers Grimm. Vol. 1 and Vol 2. Ed. and tr. Donald Ward. Philadelphia: The Institute for the Study of Human Issues, 1981.

Hunt, Margaret Raine, tr and ed. Grimm's Household Tales with the Authors' Notes. 2 vols. London: George Bell and Sons, 1884.

Uther, Hans-Jörg. The Types of International Folktales: A Classification and Bibliography Based on the System of Antti Aarne and Stith Thompson. Vols 1-3. FF Communications No. 284-86, Helsinki: Academia Scientiarum Fennica, 2004.

Brothers Grimm household tales classified, ATU numbers for Grimm tales, To top Section Set Next

Brothers Grimm household tales classified, ATU numbers for Grimm tales. USER'S GUIDE: [Link]
Collation © 2007–2017, Tormod Kinnes, MPhil. [Email]  ᴥ  Disclaimer: [Link]